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Smithsonian ‘Outbreak’ exhibition spreads to Lewis University

10/16/2019, 3:49 p.m.
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History’s “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” exhibition will be on display from 10 ...

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History’s “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” exhibition will be on display from 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. October 21-23 in the Brent and Jean Wadsworth Family Gallery on Lewis University’s main campus in Romeoville.

The exhibition highlights how pathogens can spread to people from wildlife and livestock, why some outbreaks become epidemics and how human, animal and environmental health are connected. It also covers topics such as infectious disease spread and treatment, and features pathogens such as Influenza, West Nile Virus, HIV and others.

Lewis University students in the Biology Transitions program added a panel to the exhibit with information on the West Nile virus including 3D models, printed in the Lewis University Maker Lab.

Lewis University Biology students from the Scientific Inquiry course who created some content for this exhibit include Faith Alfrejd of Midlothian, Abby Bruyn of Morris, Natasha Cornelious of Romeoville, Fatimah Jabali of Naperville, Alexis Jawdat of Minooka, Eujean Kang of Crest Hill, Rubab Kazmi of Romeoville, Jill Komives of Oak Forest, Mia Macias of Plainfield, Stephanie Orozco of Lockport, Amanda Stepien of Romeoville, James Szymanski of Orland Park, Angelica Vega of Justice, Alyssa Walsh of Posen, and Zainab Yaseen of Woodridge.

The Biology Transitions program supports transfer students with demonstrated financial need and academic promise to succeed in STEM disciplines at Lewis University. A nearly $1 million National Science Foundation grant provides funding for 28 scholarships over five years for transfer students who are pursuing bachelor’s degrees in biological sciences.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History is one of the most-visited natural history museums in the world. “Outbreak” opened at the museum May 18, 2018, in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the 1918 influenza pandemic, and will remain on view until 2021.