Remains of black men and one woman found on former Texas plantation

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Remains of black men and one woman found on former Texas plantation

The remains of black men and a black woman forced to work for free as part of a convict-leasing program that came into being after the 13th Amendment ended slavery except in certain instances have been found on a former Texas sugar plantation. Construction crews so far have exhumed 95 sets of human remains in Sugar Land, Texas, near Houston. The area was the location of large sugar plantations worked by black men and black women until they died from exhaustion, beatings or disease. The men and women are believed to have died between 1878 and 1910, CBS Houston affiliate KHOU reported. The bodies are of individuals ranging in age from 15 to 70. At one time, the area was known as the “Hell on the Brazos,” named after Brazos, a Texas river. Workmen discovered the remains while constructing a building for the Fort Bend County, Texas, school district. Sugar Land is located in Fort Bend County. There are also reports that more remains also could be found in the area, which included other sugar plantations and prison camps.